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KS4 English

Please click on the links below to find out more about each unit.

Year Long Term Objective: Students will study the majority of their literature set texts, learning the plot, context and main themes. Pupisl will also study a range of fiction and non-fiction texts – using them as a stimulus to analyse and evaluate writers’ methods, as well as using them as a springboard in developing their own writing style. Pupils will also complete a Spoken Language presentation.
Year Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1  Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2
Medium Term Objective: Students will secure the foundations to confidently handle an unfamiliar text. A deliberate focus on engaging stories and characters will shape the year.
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Lord of the Flies and Language Paper 1: Creative Writing and Reading Jekyll and Hyde / Introduction to Language Paper 2 Jekyll and Hyde / Continuation of Language Paper 2 The Anthology – Power and Conflict (War) The Endorsement – Spoken Language (The Speech) The Anthology – Power and Conflict (Power of Nature)
Medium Term Objective: Students will finish studying their literature set texts, revisiti and revise all the literature texts, practising exam responses to develop a critical, academic writing style. Pupils will continue to be exposed to a range of fiction and non-fiction texts, and continue to work on refining and crafting their writing skills.
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Language Paper 1
Language Paper 2
Unseen Poetry
Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet or Macbeth)
Language Paper 2
Language Paper 1
Language Paper 2
Lord of the Flies
Jekyll and Hyde
Shakespeare
Power and Conflict Poetry
Unseen Poetry
Language Paper 1
Language Paper 2
Lord of the Flies
Jekyll and Hyde
Shakespeare
Power and Conflict Poetry
Unseen Poetry Pre-release
Exams

Lord of the Flies and Language Paper 1: Creative Writing and Reading

Overview

A further and deeper look into the novel Lord of the Flies while interweaving core skills of the GCSE Language Paper 1. Pupils will develop their understanding of how writers communicate important messages through the narrative techniques of characterisation and structure and how such messages are influenced by contextual factors. Furthermore, pupils will continue to hone their creative writing skills and increase the impact of their writing techniques while exploring unseen fictional texts.

Unit aims:

  • Revisit the modern novel / taking a closer look at the writer’s craft
  • Interweave skills across language and literature
  • Use Golding style to inspire own craft
  • Explore, with greater insight, into to influence and intentions of the writer
  • Explicit teaching of essay planning and building
  • Revisiting AO6 skills, uplevelling – ambitious and sophisticated structures
  • Develop selection and retrieval skills to evidence ideas
  • Develop contextual analysis by including theories within study
  • Develop critical thinking skills
  • Consider, reflect and explore how key themes are presented in the novel.
  • Develop effective revision strategies
  • Introduction and practise of Language Paper 1

Example Key Words

Allegory

A story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one.

Symbolism

The use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities.

Foreshadowing

A warning or indication of a future event.

Totalitarian

Relating to a system of government that is centralised and dictatorial and requires complete subservience to the state.

Conditioning

The process of training or accustoming a person or animal to behave in a certain way or to accept certain circumstances.

Dystopian

Relating to or denoting an imagined state or society where there is great suffering or injustice.

External Links

GCSEPod (Lord of the Flies)

GCSEPod (Paper 1 Language)

Audiobook: Lord of the Flies William Golding Audiobook – YouTube

Jekyll and Hyde / Introduction to Language Paper 2

Overview

The introduction of the second GCSE text: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Pupils will read and study the whole novella while exploring thematically linked non-fiction texts. Pupils will also explore writer’s methods on non-fiction while learning how to craft and structure their own opinion pieces.

Unit aims:

  • Read and study a whole novella
  • Explore plot, characterisation, themes and writer’s craft within the genre
  • Make links between ideas and contextual influences
  • Evaluate writer’s use of methods to impact the reader/audience
  • Exploring unseen non-fiction texts thematically linked to the novella
  • Develop effective revision strategies
  • Introduction and practise of Language Paper 2

Example Key Words

Calvinism

The Protestant theological system of John Calvin and his successors, which develops Luther’s doctrine of justification by faith alone into an emphasis on the grace of God and centres on the doctrine of predestination.

juxtaposition

The juxtaposition of two contrasting objects, images, or ideas is the fact that they are put together, so that the differences between them are emphasised.

gothic

In Gothic stories, strange, mysterious adventures happen in dark and lonely places such as graveyards and old castles.

troglodyte

A cave dweller, esp one of the prehistoric peoples thought to have lived in caves

allegory

A story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one.

motifs

A recurring subject, image, theme or idea within a text (this could be articles, poetry, novels… you name it!).

External Links

GCSEPod (Jekyll and Hyde)

GCSEPod (Paper 2 Language)

Audiobook: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde – FULL AudioBook

Jekyll and Hyde / Continuation of Language Paper 2

Overview

The study continues of our second GCSE text: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Pupils will read and study the whole novella while exploring thematically linked non-fiction texts. Pupils will also explore writer’s methods on non-fiction while learning how to craft and structure their own opinion pieces.

Unit aims:

  • Read and study a whole novella
  • Explore plot, characterisation, themes and writer’s craft within the genre
  • Make links between ideas and contextual influences
  • Evaluate writer’s use of methods to impact the reader/audience
  • Exploring unseen non-fiction texts thematically linked to the novella
  • Develop effective revision strategies
  • Introduction and practise of Language Paper 2

Example Key Words

Calvinism

The Protestant theological system of John Calvin and his successors, which develops Luther’s doctrine of justification by faith alone into an emphasis on the grace of God and centres on the doctrine of predestination.

juxtaposition

The juxtaposition of two contrasting objects, images, or ideas is the fact that they are put together, so that the differences between them are emphasised.

gothic

In Gothic stories, strange, mysterious adventures happen in dark and lonely places such as graveyards and old castles.

troglodyte

A cave dweller, esp one of the prehistoric peoples thought to have lived in caves

allegory

A story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one.

motifs

A recurring subject, image, theme or idea within a text (this could be articles, poetry, novels… you name it!).

External Links

GCSEPod (Jekyll and Hyde)

GCSEPod (Paper 2 Language)

Audiobook: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde – FULL AudioBook

The Anthology – Power and Conflict (War)

Overview

Pupils will begin their studies of the war poems within the Power & Conflict section of the AQA Anthology. The poems, naturally, have a link to either power or conflict. This may be a literal conflict for power, or a mental/emotional conflict. For each poem it is necessary to know the context behind it, such as what inspired the poet to write the poem, or what was happening at the time of writing. Pupils will also make connections between poems and learn how to compare and make these connections.

Unit aims:

  • Read and study the war poems within the Anthology:
    • War Photographer
    • Bayonet Charge
    • Remains
    • Charge of the Light Brigade
    • Poppies
  • Explore content, themes and poet’s craft
  • Make links between ideas and contextual influences
  • Evaluate poet’s use of methods to impact the reader/audience
  • Develop effective revision strategies

Example Key Words

anaphora

The repetition of a word or phrase, usually at the beginning of a line.

alliteration

The repetition of sounds in a sequence of words. (See also consonance and assonance.)

assonance

The repetition of vowel-sounds.

beat

A stressed (or accented) syllable.

blank verse

unrhymed iambic pentameter.

caesura

An audible pause internal to a line, usually in the middle. (An audible pause at the end of a line is called an end-stop.)

External Links

GCSEPod – Power and Conflict poems

The Endorsement – Spoken Language (The Speech)

Overview

As part of your English Language GCSE pupils will participate in a speaking and listening assessment. Pupils will read, watch, and analyse a range of speeches across a range of topics – this study will support them in planning and writing their own persuasive speech on a topic of their choice.  The speeches are recorded in small groups where active listening skills are required in order to ask their peers probing and thoughtful questions.

Unit aims:

  • Read and study a range powerful speeches from across time
  • Understand how the power of language can influence, inspire and motivate
  • Apply a range of persuasive techniques to their work in order to produce their own speech
  • Apply valuable research that will enhance speeches
  • Practice speaking within a forum
  • Plan and edit effectively

Example Key Words

Use of quotations

Using direct speech from somebody else to back up the point you are making.

Alliteration

When you use consecutive words that all begin with same letter.

Use of facts and statistics

Using carefully researched information to back up the point you are making.

Rhetorical Questions

Using questions that make the reader think, usually to get them to think about your point of view.

Strong Ending

Making sure your finish your argument with a particularly powerful point.

Repetition

Saying the same words or phrase a number of times to ensure that it sticks in the reader’s mind.

The Anthology – Power and Conflict (Power of Nature)

Overview

Pupils will commence their studies of the ‘power of nature’ poems within the Power & Conflict section of the AQA Anthology. The poems, naturally, have a link to either power or conflict. This may be a literal conflict for power, or a mental/emotional conflict. For each poem it is necessary to know the context behind it, such as what inspired the poet to write the poem, or what was happening at the time of writing. Pupils will also make connections between poems and build their confidence in planning and writing a comparison.

Unit aims:

  • Read and study the ‘power of nature’ within the Anthology:
    • The Prelude
    • Storm on the Island
    • Exposure
    • Ozymandias
  • Explore content, themes, and poet’s craft
  • Make links between ideas and contextual influences
  • Evaluate poet’s use of methods to impact the reader/audience
  • Develop effective revision strategies

Example Key Words

alliteration

The repetition of sounds in a sequence of words. (See also consonance and assonance.)

assonance

The repetition of vowel-sounds.

beat

A stressed (or accented) syllable.

blank verse

unrhymed iambic pentameter.

caesura

An audible pause internal to a line, usually in the middle. (An audible pause at the end of a line is called an end-stop.)

climax

The high point; the moment of greatest tension or intensity. The climax can occur at any point in a poem, and can register on different levels, e.g. narrative, rhetorical, or formal.

External Links

GCSEPod – Power and Conflict poems

Language Paper 1, Language Paper 2, Unseen Poetry

Overview

Pupils will revisit AQA Language Paper 1 and Paper 2 in order to prepare for their Autumn mocks. This will be the first opportunity to sit the paper in full in exam conditions and a rigorous reflection process will support them in developing their skills further. In addition to this, pupils will continue to study a range of unseen poetry to familiarise themselves with this element of the exam and build on their resilience and resourcefulness with these proactive approaches.

Unit aims:

  • Explain, comment and analyse a writer’s use of language and structure in fictional and non-fiction texts,
  • Compare writers’ ideas perspectives in non-fiction text,
  • Write creatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences,
  • Use a range of vocabulary and sentences for clarity and purpose and effect,
  • Explore content, themes and a poet’s craft in unseen poetry,
  • Evaluate poet’s use of methods to impact the reader/audience,
  • Develop effective revision strategies.

Example Key Words

alliteration

The repetition of sounds in a sequence of words. (See also consonance and assonance.)

assonance

The repetition of vowel-sounds.

beat

A stressed (or accented) syllable.

blank verse

unrhymed iambic pentameter.

caesura

An audible pause internal to a line, usually in the middle. (An audible pause at the end of a line is called an end-stop.)

climax

The high point; the moment of greatest tension or intensity. The climax can occur at any point in a poem, and can register on different levels, e.g. narrative, rhetorical, or formal.

External Links

GCSEPod – Power and Conflict poems

Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet or Macbeth), Language Paper 2

Overview

Pupils will be introduced to their final GCSE Literature text: Romeo and Juliet or Macbeth. Alongside this comprehensive study, their skills in critical analysis will be interweaved with the core assessment objectives found in their English Language GCSE. Themes will be interwoven with current topics prevalent today while incorporating significant historical value and the context needed to propel their understanding and the construction of these texts.

Unit aims:

  • Read and study a whole Shakespeare play
  • Explore plot, characterisation, themes and symbols within the genre
  • Make links between ideas and contextual influences
  • Evaluate writer’s use of methods to impact the reader/audience
  • Exploring unseen non-fiction texts thematically linked to the play

Example Key Words

couplet

Two lines of a verse usually rhymed. Heroic couplet: a rhymed iambic pentameter couplet.

dramatic irony

This occurs when the audience know more about what is happening that some of the characters themselves know

elegy

Usually denotes a reflective poem that laments the loss of something or someone.

enjambment

A “run-on” line that carries over into the next to complete its meaning.

foot

The basic unit of accentual-syllabic and quantitative meter, usually combining a stress with one or more unstressed syllables.

free verse

Poetry in which the rhythm does not repeat regularly.

Language Paper 1, Language Paper 2, Lord of the Flies, Jekyll and Hyde, Shakespeare, Power and Conflict Poetry, Unseen Poetry

Overview

Language

Pupils will revisit AQA Language Paper 1 and Paper 2 to prepare for their next mock exams and then final exams.  This will include DIRT activities on their Autumn mock exams, as well as enhancing their knowledge of the key skills needed in both exam papers.  Pupils will complete regular practice questions to prepare them for their final exams in May/June.

Literature

Pupils will revisit all their key set texts, revising plot, characterisation, themes, symbols and context.  Pupils will cover a range of activities including knowledge organisers, close extract analysis, and exam question practice.

Unit aims:

  • Explain, comment and analyse a writer’s use of language and structure in fictional and non-fiction texts,
  • Compare writers’ ideas perspectives in non-fiction text,
  • Write creatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences,
  • Use a range of vocabulary and sentences for clarity and purpose and effect,
  • Explore content, themes and characters in set texts
  • Explore content, themes and a poet’s craft in unseen poetry,
  • Analyse and evaluate writers’ use of methods to impact the reader/audience,
  • Understand how contextual influences influence writers’ ideas
  • Develop effective revision strategies.

Example Key Words

See previous schemes of learning for specific text key words

External Links

GCSEPod

Seneca Learning

Language Paper 1, Language Paper 2, Lord of the Flies, Jekyll and Hyde, Shakespeare, Power and Conflict Poetry, Unseen Poetry

Overview

Language

Pupils will revisit AQA Language Paper 1 and Paper 2 to prepare for their next final exams.  This will include DIRT activities on their mock exams, as well as enhancing their knowledge of the key skills needed in both exam papers.  Pupils will complete regular practice questions to prepare them for their final exams later this term.

Literature

Pupils will revisit all their key set texts, revising plot, characterisation, themes, symbols and context.  Pupils will cover a range of activities including knowledge organisers, close extract analysis, and exam question practice.

Unit aims:

  • Explain, comment and analyse a writer’s use of language and structure in fictional and non-fiction texts,
  • Compare writers’ ideas perspectives in non-fiction text,
  • Write creatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences,
  • Use a range of vocabulary and sentences for clarity and purpose and effect,
  • Explore content, themes and characters in set texts
  • Explore content, themes and a poet’s craft in unseen poetry,
  • Analyse and evaluate writers’ use of methods to impact the reader/audience,
  • Understand how contextual influences influence writers’ ideas
  • Develop effective revision strategies.

Example Key Words

See previous schemes of learning for specific text key words

External Links

GCSEPod

Seneca Learning